Finance, Loan, Debt and Credit.

March 13, 2018

Potential Disadvantages of an Adjustable Rate Mortgage

Filed under: Mortgage — Tags: , , , , , , , — admin @ 12:46 am

There are both advantages and disadvantages to adjustable rate mortgages. Your lender may be pushing an adjustable rate mortgage for any number of reasons, including that they are more profitable for the lending company. If you only look at the advantages of an adjustable rate mortgage, they can sound pretty good. You start with a lower interest rate, which means lower monthly payments. Because of the lower payments and rate, you may be able to afford a larger mortgage. Your lender may be pitching it as a way to buy a bigger house than you could otherwise afford, or suggest that it’s a good way to get into the housing market. Most commonly, the lender may suggest that you should take the adjustable rate mortgage for now, and refinance later when the rates adjust up. While all of these things are true, there are also cons to an adjustable rate mortgage. It’s important that you consider both sides of the issue before making a decision on the type of mortgage that you want to take out.What an adjustable rate mortgage is Unlike a fixed mortgage, which comes with a specific interest rate that remains the same for the life of the loan, an adjustable rate mortgage (ARM) has an interest rate that fluctuates according to a specified index. Your adjustable rate may be tied to the interest rate on Treasury Bonds, to the Consumer Price Index or to a number of other indicators. If that index rises, your interest rate – and your monthly payment – will rise. If it drops, so will your interest rate and monthly payment. Why adjustable rate mortgages can be attractive When lenders approve a fixed rate mortgage, they are placing a finite limit on the amount of money they’ll make from that mortgage. An adjustable rate mortgage offers the lender the possibility of making more money if interest rates rise over the life of the loan – which is a good possibility. To offset the limit on fixed rate mortgages and make adjustable rate mortgages more attractive to home buyers, lenders typically offer lower interest rates on adjustable rate mortgages than they do on fixed rate mortgages. In essence, they are offering borrowers a more attractive rate in return for assuming the risk that their mortgage rate and monthly payment will rise over the term of the loan.The down side of adjustable rate mortgages When looked at in that light, some of the cons of an adjustable rate mortgage become obvious.1. Interest rates can go up, raising monthly payments as well. Most borrowers understand and accept that their monthly mortgage payment may rise, but are willing to take the chance that their mortgage will continue to remain affordable. It’s important to know the caps on interest rate rises by which your lender is bound. When you shop around for the best adjustable mortgage, it’s important to look further than the initial interest rate so that you understand exactly what expenses you may be agreeing to.2. Over time, payments nearly always surpass the payments on a fixed rate loan for the same amount. If you’re planning to stay in your home for the long haul, this can be an important consideration. Depending on the specific loan agreement that you make, it may be several years before the interest rate and monthly payment reach and surpass the monthly payment for a fixed mortgage. If you’re only planning to stay in your new home for a few years, this can work to your advantage, because you’ll be paying lower monthly payments for most of that time. If, on the other hand, this is your dream home where you plan to live the rest of your life, a fixed rate mortgage is probably more economical.3. Fluctuating payments can make it difficult for you to make a budget. While many ARMs only adjust once a year, some may adjust as often as once a month. More frequent adjustments can make it very difficult to fit your monthly mortgage payment into your budget because you will only know what your next month’s payment will be when you receive your notice. Even in the longer term, a fluctuating mortgage payment can make it difficult for you to plan long-term savings and investments.4. If fixed rate mortgages become favorable enough that you decide to switch, you’ll have to refinance and incur the costs and fees related to refinancing your mortgage.5. The annual interest cap may not apply to the first interest adjustment, and it may be a big one. Many lenders offer very low initial interest rates on ARMs to attract first time home buyers. Often, these mortgages exempt the first increase from the annual cap on adjustments. This can be especially difficult if the ARM was one of the hybrids that offered a low fixed rate for one to five years, with a jump to market interest rates at the end of the specified period. When that happens, your monthly mortgage payment can suddenly rise by hundreds or even more than a thousand dollars.

Brain Jenkins is a freelance writer who writes about topics and financial products pertaining to the mortgage industry such an adjustable rate mortgage available from a mortgage company.

March 9, 2018

How a Mortgage Rate is Calculated

Filed under: Mortgage — Tags: , , , — admin @ 12:46 pm

One of the most important parts of your mortgage is the mortgage rate – the rate of interest that you’ll pay on the money you borrow to buy your house. Often, ads for mortgage lenders make it sound as if they offer a single mortgage rate to all lenders. If that were the truth, it would be easy to find the right mortgage – just shop around for the lender advertising the lowest interest rate and apply for a mortgage with them. Unfortunately for simplicity, calculating a mortgage rate is far more complex than that. The truth is that the mortgage rate that you’re offered is influenced by many different things. Prime Lending Rate Mortgage lenders generally base their calculations of their mortgage rates on the prime lending rate. That’s not to say that the prime lending rate is the mortgage rate that they’ll offer to customers. Rather, it’s the starting point of their calculations for their mortgage rates. The prime lending rate is the interest rate that most commercial banks charge their most creditworthy customers. It is adjusted up or down, usually in increments of 1/8 or ¼ of a percentage point. It responds to both the availability of money to loan and the demand for loans in the marketplace. Because those things tend to be the same across the board, most of the major banks will be offering the same prime lending rate.First time borrower? If you’re a first time home buyer and your credit is good, banks and lenders will often offer mortgages at a discounted rate – one that is below the prime lending rate – in order to attract your business. First time home buyers who meet certain income guidelines may also qualify for first-time home buyer loans guaranteed by the federal government. One of the conditions of those loans is a very low interest rate, usually several points below the prime lending rate.Your credit rating One of the major factors that affects the mortgage rate a bank or lender will offer you is your credit rating or your credit score. Lenders use your credit score to determine whether or not they’ll lend you money, and how much they’ll charge you in interest for the money that you borrow. The better your credit rating, the lower the mortgage rate you’ll be offered.The type of mortgage Different types of mortgages carry different risks for lenders. The higher the perceived risk to the lender, the more interest they’ll charge you for your mortgage. Adjustable rate mortgages (ARMs) present the lowest risks to the lenders because your mortgage rate can rise if the interest rates rise. Fixed rate mortgages are riskier for lenders. They’re making the gamble that interest rates won’t rise above the mortgage rate that they charge you. Thus, fixed rate mortgages nearly always carry higher interest rates than adjustable rate mortgages. This can be affected by the size of the loan, and how adjustments are calculated. The amount and length of the mortgage It’s a general but not a hard and fast rule that the larger the amount borrowed, the lower the interest rate will be. In addition, the longer the term of your mortgage, the lower the rate will be. These differences can be very slight up front, but they add up over the life of the loan. A difference of an eight of a percent can save you tens of thousands over the course of thirty years.The amount of your down payment In many cases, the amount that you can offer up as down payment will affect your mortgage rate. The reason is simple enough – the more you put down on your house, the more likely it is that you will not default on your mortgage. Zero-down mortgages generally carry mortgage rates that are considerably higher than the prime lending rate. Depending on the lender and the state of the economy in general when you take out a mortgage, a down payment of as little as 5% or as high as 20% may make a difference in the amount of mortgage rate that you’re offered. What about the APR? The Annualized Percentage Rate is the total cost of the loan expressed as an annual percentage rate on the amount borrowed. The APR includes any fees that are paid in addition to the interest rate, so it may differ from the mortgage rate advertised by the lender. In the United States, lenders are required by law to disclose the cost of the loan as a standardized APR in order to make it easier for consumers to compare loans.

Shawn Thomas is a freelance writer who writes about topics pertaining to the mortgage industry such as a Pennsylvania Mortgage

February 16, 2018

Use a Mortgage Loan Calculator When Comparing a Modification Loan Or Refinance Loan Mortgage Rate

Here are 3 common scenarios where using a mortgage calculator can help you decide what to do …

1.  Should I Refinance?

First, determine your main goal.  For example:  Are you more concerned with short term savings – (reducing your monthly payment now), or, do you want to save more money in the long run? .

For example. If you had a 30 year loan at 5% interest, and you’d been making monthly payments on it for the last 5 years (60 months), you’d reduce your monthly payment if you refinanced for a new 30 year period, say at 4.5%.

But you could still end up paying more over the long run.  The problem is you have no way of knowing that until all the related expenses are factored in.  And this is where a mortgage loan calculator can help you.  The calculator has places for you to input the various closing costs, fees, taxes, etc. And only after considering all the related expenses will you know whether or not you’re coming out ahead.

2.  How Much Income Will I Need to Qualify?

Nothing feels worse than finding the home of  your dreams and then being turned down when you try to arrange financing.  Once again, this is a case where using a mortgage calculator can really help.  Wouldn’t you rather know if you can qualify for the loan before you apply?

Here’s what you’ll need to know …

First:  the cost of the home;  the expected interest rate;  the term of the mortgage (i.e., how many years?);  and your down payment.  This will show you the total monthly payment on the principal and interest.  But you’re not finished yet!

Next, add in the annual property taxes and annual insurance costs.  Using all the above criteria the calculator will tell you what your gross monthly income needs to be in order to qualify for a loan on your dream home.

3.  Should I Rent or Buy?

Remember the days when we were told that buying a home is ALWAYS a good investment?  Emotionally that’s probably true.  But it’s not always the case mathematically.  Sometimes you’re better off renting, especially in uncertain times.

Here’s how to know …

First, understand you’re going to be using your “best guess” estimates.  But with a little research you should be able to come pretty close (most of the research simply involves presenting a couple of questions to a knowledgeable realtor or property manager).  Here are the questions on the home ownership side of the equation:

What annual maintenance costs are typical for a home like this?  What’s the annual appreciation %  I could expect on this property?  What % selling costs should I expect?  What are the annual taxes and insurance?  What is the PMI (private mortgage insurance).

Your rental questions are much simpler.  First, – how many years do you plan on being in the home before selling?  Second, how much is the monthly rental payment?  And third, what is the annual rate increase % expected to rent this home?  Now you’re ready.

Using all the factors above a mortgage calculator will tell you — 1.  The total of the payments you’d make buying vs renting, 2.  the total you’d save on rent, and,  3. the total home purchase benefits.  This will help you make an objective decision based solely upon the financial implications.

Other Uses

Other ways you can use a mortgage calculator include finding answers to the following:  What would the monthly payment be?  What is the mortgage principal?  What if I pay extra each month?  Should I pay points to lower my interest rate?  Which loan is better between two or more offers?  What difference would a bi-weekly mortgage vs. a standard mortgage make?

As you may imagine we haven’t even “scratched the surface” of the many benefits of using a mortgage calculator.  They can pay off handsomely.

Virgil Stanphill has been involved in different forms of Business or Ministry for most of the last 25+ years. He currently divides his time between both, helping people overcome challenges they face in the workplace and in day-to-day life – currently, working to help people stay in their homes during these tough economic times.

His business background includes marketing, direct sales, and freelance copywriting, requiring broad research and application in various fields.

His ministry includes writing, teaching, and public speaking.

February 5, 2018

Is a Capped Rate Mortgage Right for You?

Filed under: Mortgage — Tags: , , , , — admin @ 12:47 pm

The first two considerations you have when arranging a mortgage are what type of mortgage rate is required along with how the mortgage will be repaid. The following article looks at the different mortgage rate options such as fixed rates, discounted rates, capped, variable and tracker rates, along with the main advantages and disadvantages for each option.
When considering which type of mortgage product is suitable for your needs, it pays to consider your attitude to risk, as those with a cautious attitude to risk may find a fixed or capped rate more appropriate, whereas those with a more adventurous attitude to risk may find a tracker rate that fluctuates up and down more appealing.
Following is a description of the different mortgage rate options along with a summary of the main advantages and disadvantages for each option.
Fixed Rate Mortgages
With a fixed rate mortgage you can lock into a fixed repayment cost that will not fluctuate up or down with movements in the Bank of England base rate, or the lenders Standard Variable Rate. The most popular fixed rate mortgages are 2, 3 and 5 year fixed rates, but fixed rates of between 10 years and 30 years are now more common at reasonable rates. As a general rule of thumb, the longer the fixed rate period the higher the interest rate. This is also applicable when considering the percentage loan to value, where borrowing below 75% of the property value will attract a lower fixed rate in comparison to an 85% or 90% loan to value which will attract a higher fixed rate percentage.
Having the peace of mind that your mortgage payment will not rise with increases in the base rate. This makes budgeting easier for the fixed rate period selected, and can be advantageous to first time buyers or those stretching themselves to the maximum affordable payment.
The monthly repayment will remain the same even when the economic environment sees the Bank of England and lenders reducing their base rates. In these circumstances where the fixed rate ends up costing more, remembering why the initial decision was made to select a fixed rate, can be helpful.
Discount Rate Mortgages
With a discount rate mortgage, you are offered a percentage off of the lenders Standard Variable Rate (SVR). This takes the form of a reduction in the normal variable interest rate by say, 1.5% for a year or two. The common mistake of those considering a discount rate, is to assume the higher the percentage discount offered, the better the deal. The key bit of information missing however, is what the lenders SVR is, as this will dictate the actual pay rate after the discount is applied.
As with a fixed rate, the longer the discount rate period the smaller the discount offered, and the higher the rate. Shorter periods such as 2 years will attract the highest levels of discount. In addition when considering the amount to be borrowed, the increased risk to the lender of providing a 90% loan will be reflected in the pay rate, with lower borrowing amounts attracting more competitive rates.
Should the lender reduce their standard variable rate your interest rate and monthly payment will also reduce.
When the lender or Bank of England increases their base rate, your mortgage payment will also increase. However in some circumstances lenders do not always pass on the full amount of a Bank of England base rate reduction.
Affordability of the mortgage at the end of the discount rate period should be considered at outset. There are no guarantees that follow on rates will be available, and so you should make certain that you are able to afford the monthly payment at the lenders standard variable applicable upon expiry of the discount rate period. Allowing for an increase in interest rates above the SVR would be prudent to avoid a ‘Payment shock’.
Tracker Rate Mortgages
Tracker rate mortgages guarantee to follow the Bank of England base rate when it moves up or down. Tracker rates are expressed as a percentage above or below the Bank of England base rate such at +0.5% over BOE base rate for 2 years.
The most popular tracker rate mortgages have been 2 and 3 year products, but there is now an increasing demand for lifetime tracker rates as borrowers are starting to realise that the Bank of England base rate has been reasonable competitive, and having a mortgage product linked to it could be beneficial in the long term.
A tracker rate guarantees to follow the Bank of England base rate for however long the tracker rate is set up for. This means that as soon as the Bank of England cuts rates, a tracker rate mortgage guarantees to reflect the new lower rate and repayment.
The overall cost calculation of a Lifetime tracker rate can be significantly lower than taking shorter term mortgage products with the ongoing costs of remortgaging such as valuation fees, legal fee and lender arrangement fees. Lifetime tracker rates often have no early repayment penalty restrictions.
The mortgage payment will go up if the Bank of England increases the base rate. Early repayment charges are likely to be applicable during the benefit period, and as with other types of mortgage rate are likely to be 6 months interest or 3% – 5% of the loan.
Variable Rate Mortgages
Variable rate mortgages are more commonly known as the lenders Standard Variable Rate (SVR), and are the rate that you come onto after the expiry of a fixed, discounted, tracker or capped rate mortgage. A variable rate is similar to a tracker rate in as much as the lender will base their SVR on the Bank of England base rate plus a loading of between say 2.5% and 3.5%. That is where the similarity ends however.
The main advantage of being on the lenders Standard Variable Rate (SVR) is that there will be no early repayment charge for redeeming the loan in full. This provides a certain amount of flexibility when there is uncertainty in the market about where rates are moving. For those wishing to fix their mortgage rate, an SVR with no early repayment charge can provide the breathing space required to just wait and see before committing.
Whilst not always the case lenders do tend to pass on reductions in the Bank of England base rate through their SVR, and so those on the SVR will benefit from a reduction in the mortgage payment.
Generally the SVR will be a higher rate of interest and so your mortgage payment will be greater than if you were on a tracker rate, fixed rate or discounted rate mortgage product. In addition, as has been seen in the past, some lenders do not pass on any or all of a reduction in the Bank of England base rate which results in a higher monthly payment in comparison to other mortgage options.
Capped Rate Mortgages
The capped rate is a variable rate mortgage which has a fixed limit to how far the interest rate can increase (the cap), and provides the option to know the maximum level of mortgage payment from outset. Capped rate mortgages offer the best of both worlds for those with a cautious attitude to risk, but who still wish to benefit from interest rate reductions. For example if the cap is set at 6% and the banks rates go below this rate, then your repayments will go down to reflect the reduction, with the guarantee that should rates go above the 6%, your payments will remain based on the maximum 6% because of the cap.
If the Bank of England base rate falls resulting in a fall in the lenders standard variable rate below the level of the capped rate, then your monthly repayment will reduce. For many this provides the peace of mind and certainty for ease of budgeting offered by a know maximum monthly payment.
Because a capped rate offers the best of both worlds to the borrower, the capped rate is usually uncompetitive as lenders need to price in the risk of rate reductions, leaving those such as first time buyers or those stretching their affordability, exposed to a higher rate than would be available with a fixed rate. This means that UK lenders generally don’t offer capped rate mortgages with any sort of competitive rate, preferring to market fixed rates instead.

For independent, impartial advice about Mortgage Rates and Equity Release Schemes contact Jerry Figueroa-Lee co-founder of The Mortgage Warehouse.

January 25, 2018

How a Fixed Rate Mortgage Can be Beneficial When Buying a Home

Filed under: Mortgage — Tags: , , , , , , , , , — admin @ 12:47 pm

If you are just about to buy a house, one of your most important decisions, almost as important as which home you buy, is what type of mortgage to take out. You basically have two choices; a fixed rate mortgage (FRM) or an adjustable rate mortgage (ARM) Choosing a mortgage that best fits your specific needs can potentially either save or cost you a great deal of money over the term of the mortgage. Around 70% of homebuyers today choose a fixed rate mortgage, rather than an adjustable rate mortgage. A fixed rate mortgage is exactly what it sounds like. The interest rate on the loan doesn’t change, regardless of whether interest rates in general go up or down. An adjustable rate mortgage may go up or down, depending on the interest rate at the time. Your decision may be influenced by your overall financial situation, the present state of the economy and the cost of your house.The overall amount that you end up paying for your home can be greatly influenced by even a small change in the interest rate. A lowering of the interest rate by just one point can mean that a homeowner with a 30 year mortgage can enjoy average savings of around $50,000 over the term of their mortgage. An increase in the interest rate of just one or two percent can mean monthly payments that are between $50 and $250 higher, depending on how much you paid for your home. Whether you are taking out a 15 or 30 year mortgage may also influence your decision to take out an adjustable rate or fixed rate mortgage.The biggest benefit of a fixed rate mortgage is the peace of mind that comes with knowing that regardless of how bad the economy is the rate on your mortgage loan won’t increase; neither will your monthly payment amounts. In fact, the terms and conditions of a fixed rate mortgage are protected by law. A fixed rate mortgage is an ideal option for those buyers who just don’t want to take a risk, or consider themselves the cautious type when it comes to finances.Another benefit of a fixed rate mortgage is that it makes it easier for the homeowner to budget the expense. Your mortgage payment is probably your single biggest expense and you always know exactly how much the monthly payment will be. Some buyers believe that this makes it a little bit easier to plan and budget for some of life’s other big expenses. Certain things like college funds and retirement for example. With a fixed rate mortgage, the amount of the monthly payment will only increase if there is an increase in the amount of insurance rates or property taxes.A fixed rate mortgage is not affected by inflation or the cost of living. Supposing you have a monthly mortgage payment of $700; this amount will still be the same after five, ten, and twenty years have gone by. Even though everything else has increased in cost, your mortgage payment will stay the same. One way to offset this is to consider the possibilities in the future. Chances are you could have a more disposable income as time passes. You could be earning a higher salary, but still paying the same every month for your home. If you prefer the safer option of the fixed rate mortgage, one solution would be to take out a fixed rate mortgage and then refinance your loan if and when interest rates are lowered. This approach keeps your options open. If interest rates go down sufficiently to justify the cost of refinancing, you can do just that; if rates stay where they are or go up you will be glad you have the fixed rate mortgage.  Some financial experts advise that it is only worth refinancing if the interest rate will be at least 2% lower than your current rate, although that decision entirely is up to you.Another strategy that can be applied towards either a fixed rate or adjustable mortgage is to pay an extra amount each month towards the principal. By doing this regularly, you can potentially save a large amount in interest charges. It can also make the term of the mortgage shorter and you may be able to own your home sooner. Make sure that you specify that any extra amount that you pay is going towards the principal and not the interest. By doing this, if you have a fixed rate mortgage and the rate is not as low as it could be, you are getting ahead a little bit.Ultimately the decision of whether to take a fixed rate mortgage or an adjustable rate mortgage is yours. Although several factors may influence your decision, one of the biggest questions to ask yourself is how much of a risk you want to take.

Shawn Thomas is a freelance writer who writes about economic issues and financial products pertaining to the mortgage industry such a fixed rate mortgage as well as the lowest mortgage rates.

January 16, 2018

Shopping Around For The Best Possible Debt Consolidation Loan Rate

Filed under: Loan — Tags: , , , , , , , , , — admin @ 12:48 am

If you’ve made the decision to apply for and attempt to obtain a debt consolidation loan, you likely have many questions. Many of these questions likely center around how you can make sure you get the best possible debt consolidation loan rate.
There are some tips and pointers that you will want to keep in mind when it comes to getting the best debt consolidation loan rate. Through this article, you will be presented with a basic discussion of the importance of really taking the time to shop around for the best deal on a debt consolidation loan rate. In the end, shopping around truly is the only way in which you can assure that you obtain the best deal on a debt consolidation loan rate.
Of course, and as has been mentioned, the primary benefit associated with the process of in depth shopping around is the ability to enhance your chances to get the best possible debt consolidation loan rate. There can be some pretty significant variations in the interest rates charged from one lender to another when it comes to a debt consolidation loan rate. Therefore, taking the time to shop around and do some interest rate comparisons will prove to be nothing short of time very well spent.
As it relates, by shopping around you will also be able to find the best rates when it comes to the other fees and charges that are associated with a debt consolidation loan. These fees can add up pretty significantly and can be rather sizeable expense when it comes to an auto loan. And, there are differences in the fees and other costs and charges from one debt consolidation lender to another in this day and age.
If you want to find the easiest and most convenient course to take when shopping around for the best debt consolidation loan rate available, the Internet and World Wide Web can be an invaluable tool. From the comfort of your own home and in a matter of minutes, you can undertake a comparison of a number of different lenders and their debt consolidation loan rate options. You can compare interest rates, company history and many other factors through the use of the Net in your search for the best deal on a debt consolidation loan rate. Moreover, there are some solid sites that can aid you in determining what you should avoid when it comes to finding a reliable and reputable lender that specializes in a debt consolidation loan.
Finally, when it comes to shopping around for the best debt consolidation loan rate, don’t forget about the importance of talking to other people. Even in this high tech age, even in this age of mass communication, friends, family members, neighbors and colleagues can be fantastic resources of information and guidance when it comes to trying to select a good debt consolidation loan rate.

Thomas Erikson is co-founder of which provides debt consolidation information and solutions. Find out how you can effectively get your finances under control with a low Debt Consolidation Loan Rate.

September 6, 2017

Auto Refinance Loans – Loans at Cheaper Rate of Interest

Filed under: Loan — Tags: , , , , , , , , — admin @ 12:46 am

Are your credit ratings better than the time when you bought your vehicle? Do you now wish to procure a loan at less interest rate because you deserve it too? Auto refinance loans come to rescue you from the high rates of interest by assuring of a loan at lower interest rates.

You may go for auto refinance loans if you find yourself in the following situations:

1) You might be suffering from bad credit at the time of obtaining auto loan due to which you got the loan at a very high rate of interest. But over years of getting the auto loan, you worked meticulously to improve the credit ratings and now you are in the position of obtaining a loan at low rate of interest. You might now want to get rid of the previously taken high interest loan.

2) Sometimes you may be so wisely convinced by slick salesman that you buy a vehicle that is not supported by your existing income and later you realize that you have made a mistake. For buying such vehicles, loans with high interest rate are generally taken. This have an immediate bad effect on your financial health but which may recover over the years.

Refinance auto loans is the best possible way to get rid of the previously taken high interest rate loans and instead get a completely new loan. When an auto loan is refinanced the previous loan is cleared and the lending institution lends you a new loan whose interest rate, monthly instalments, repayment tenure etc. is based on existing credit ratings.

A little homework is to be done before applying for refinancing your auto loans. You must have your present credit ratings. Then you must also know the correct value of your vehicle, however appraisal is not required. Again you must study the various lenders before approaching one. You must also make sure that the agreements are put on paper. Keeping these things in mind will prove to be fruitful. You will be able to get the best possible deal in market. Internet can be used to search for the potential lenders available in market.

Mark Nikolos is an expert consultant on bad credit car loans. His expertise in this field gives him an edge when it comes to providing information on technicalities and what to keep in mind when financing your car. To find bad credit auto financing, online auto financing visit

August 9, 2017

3 Ways To Get The Lowest Interest Rate On Your Home Refinance Loan

Filed under: Loan — Tags: , , , , , , , , , — admin @ 12:46 pm

Maybe you need a little extra cash for a home remodel or college tuition, or perhaps you simply want to save some money. Whatever your reason, refinancing your home loan can be a smart move as long as you get a low rate. Here are some simple tips that can ensure you get the lowest rate possible on your Home Refinance Loan:

Clean up your credit

Lenders use your credit score as one tool for determining your interest rate. In general, the better your score, the lower your rate. Before applying to refinance your mortgage, check your credit report and look for any errors. If you find a mistake that’s negatively affecting your score–such as a payment marked as “late” when you sent it on time, or a line of credit that doesn’t belong to you–be sure to correct those errors.

Shop around

You might not necessarily get the best deal from the same finance company that holds your mortgage loan. Make sure you check out offers from other lenders. You can do this by submitting your application to multiple lending companies, or by hiring a mortgage broker that will check out numerous lenders for you. To get the largest variety of offers, try different types of companies, such as banks, credit unions, online mortgage lenders and local mortgage brokers.


Once you’ve received a few offers, take the time to negotiate with lenders. Let them know that you have other options and that you’re looking for a great deal. Mention their competitors so they know you’re serious about your loan, and be prepared to walk away if the loan company won’t give you the best rate. However, once you find a deal you like, ask the lender to “lock it in.” Interest rates change daily, and locking it in guarantees that you still get a low rate even if rates soar the next week.

Remember: the interest rate is only part of the expense of refinancing. In many cases you’ll have to pay fees, points and other extra charges. You can lower the cost of your loan by asking to have these fees waived or lowered.

August 7, 2017

Taking the Guesswork Out of Adjustable Rate Mortgages

Filed under: Mortgage — Tags: , , , , , — admin @ 12:49 am

Next to critiquing the decorating taste of your home’s previous owner, playing the “adjustable mortgage game” may rank as one of the most popular (and least pleasant) pastimes of Canadian homebuyers.

Here’s how it works.

As you’re exploring your mortgage options, you review the long and steady slide of mortgage rates in Canada over the last decade and make the decision to go with an adjustable mortgage when you buy, at renewal or when refinancing. You’re now a player. Then you watch for clues about mortgage rate movement, trying to guess the perfect moment to lock in your mortgage. The objective of the game is to try to guess the bottom… and you won’t know it’s the bottom until it’s too late. In today’s low rate environment, we should acknowledge that most of the players are already winners; but it can still be a stress-inducing game.

One way to remove all of the guesswork is to consider a capped-rate adjustable mortgage, although there are only a few options available in the marketplace.

There is a unique adjustable mortgage that is not based on the Canadian Prime Rate (the usual benchmark) – but on what is known as the Banker’s Acceptance rate: a benchmark that is used for professional money managers. In effect, the BA rate, as its known, is the rate lenders charge one another.

Not surprisingly, it’s typically much lower than prime. In fact, the effective rate of this adjustable mortgage has been consistently lower than competitive variable or adjustable rate products based on Prime. A capped version is now available.

An adjustable rate mortgage with a cap offers unlimited downside rate movement, but also provides a guarantee that the rate will never rise more than a certain percentage higher than the starting base rate – no matter what happens to the lending rates.

The rate cap takes the guesswork out of the adjustable mortgage game. If rates continue to drop, your Mortgage rate also drops accordingly. But if rates begin to rise, you know that your own mortgage rate has a fixed ceiling. Imagine, no more worrying about when to lock in your mortgage, and no more second-guessing your decisions when rates go back down again. Of course, this kind of flexibility comes at a small premium over a regular adjustable-rate mortgage.

In the past several years, more and more Canadians have passed on the security of traditional fixed-rate mortgages for the savings potential of an adjustable rate. And in an environment of dropping rates, the adjustable rate choice has proven its value to homebuyers. With today’s rates among the lowest in memory, many homeowners continue to worry about whether or not they should lock in or not. After all, we don’t want to lose the flexibility of having our rate adjustable downward… but we’d also like to have it fixed upward.

If we had a crystal ball, we could make perfect decisions about our mortgage options, and we’d know how to secure the best rate. But a mortgage that passes on declining rates and has a rate cap on the upside can be the next best thing to seeing into the future. And the result is an adjustable mortgage game that the homebuyer is heavily favoured to win.

The House Team is commited to providing quality information to help people make informed decisions about their mortgage financing needs.

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